EDUCATION CANNOT WAIT ALLOCATES US$14 MILLION TO THREE MULTI-YEAR EDUCATION PROGRAMMES IN SOMALIA REACHING MORE THAN HALF A MILLION CHILDREN AND YOUTH.

PROGRAMMES WILL BE IMPLEMENTED IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OF SOMALIA AND MEMBER STATES, SOMALILAND AND PUNTLAND WITH A WIDE RANGE OF PARTNERS

21 June 2019, New York – Education Cannot Wait announces a two-year $14 million allocation to support the launch of ground-breaking multi-year education programmes in the Federal Government of Somalia and Member States, Somaliland, and Puntland. The programmes target an overall total of 583,000 vulnerable girls and boys in a country stricken by decades of conflict, widespread violence and disasters, such as droughts and floods.

Hooriyo IDP School, Daynile, District, Somalia, Constructed by FENPS with ECW Grant in 2017 Credits: Save the Children

Education Cannot Wait facilitated the development of the programmes under the leadership of the three Education Authorities with a wide range of national and international partners. With this seed funding allocation, the Fund aims to catalyze additional financing from donors towards the total budget of the programmes that amounts to $191 million over the 2019-2021 period.

“This investment unites partners around quality education for over  half a million vulnerable girls and boys in Somalia. Finally, they will have an opportunity to lift themselves out of a cycle of disenfranchisement, violence and crisis,” said Education Cannot Wait Director, Yasmine Sherif. “This investment reaches those left furthest behind. We hope that this marks an end to their long wait for the basic right to education,”  she said. 

An estimated 3 million children are out of school across Somalia and the country has one of the world’s lowest ratios of primary-age children attendance. Only 30 per cent of boys and 21 per cent of girls of primary-school age attend primary school. At the secondary level, access to education is even more limited, especially for girls: 92 per cent of adolescents within the official age range for secondary school are not enrolled in secondary education. Children uprooted by the crisis are also particularly affected, with nearly two-thirds of displaced children not attending school.

The three programmes focus on increasing equitable access to quality education, providing safe learning environments and ensuring retention and improved learning outcomes for the most vulnerable girls and boys.  Displaced, returnee and host community children as well as children living in remote areas are specifically targeted. Activities include the rehabilitation of schools, school-feeding programmes, psychosocial support, alternative basic education and the provision of teaching and learning materials. Training and awarenesss-raising activities to increase enrolment and retention rates, address barriers to girls’ education and promote child protection and safeguarding best practices are also planned. 

Education Cannot Wait’s initial $14 million allocation is distributed over 2019-2020, with $7 million being disbursed the first year to kickstart the three programmes and $7million to be disbursed the second year, subject to satisfactory performance.

The three multi-year programmes were developed over several months in close collaboration with in-country education partners and donors. The programmes are aligned to the Education Sector Strategic Plans, Somalia’s humanitarian response plan and the Joint Resilience Action Programme produced by UN agencies in-country.

The multi-year programmes build on the achievements of Education Cannot Wait’s 2017-2018 First Emergency Response programme of $4.9 million in Somalia which focused on retaining children in schools through school feeding programmes, access to safe drinking water and promotion of hygiene best practices, support to teachers with emergency incentives, support to Community Education Committees, and the provision of teaching and learning supplies.

###

Key Facts and Figures

  • An estimated 3 million school aged children are out of school in Somalia
  • 25% of adolescent girls aged 15 to 24 are illiterate in the country
  • 62% of internally displaced children age 5-17 years in Somalia are not attending school
  • 92% of adolescents within the official age range for secondary school are not enrolled in secondary education
  • The overall budget of the three multi-year programmes is $191 million over 3 years (i.e. approximately $63 million per year)
  • Education Cannot Wait’s seed funding allocation amounts to $7 million per year, divided among the programmes on a needs basis ($2.9 million for the programme in the Federal Government of Somalia and Member States, $2.2 million for the programme in Somaliland, and $1.8 million for the programme in Puntland)
  • If fully funded, the three programmes will benefit close to 583,000 children and youth – half of whom are girls – and 12,000 teachers (40% female).

Notes to Editors:

About Education Cannot Wait (ECW):

ECW is the first global fund dedicated to education in emergencies. It was launched by international humanitarian and development aid actors, along with public and private donors, to address the urgent education needs of 75 million children and youth in conflict and crisis settings.  

Since it became operational in 2017 the Fund has invested in 25 crisis-affected countries is reaching more than 1.4 million children and youth. ECW’s investment modalities are designed to usher in a more collaborative approach among actors on the ground, ensuring relief and development organizations join forces to achieve education outcomes.

Education Cannot Wait is hosted by UNICEF. The Fund is administered under UNICEF’s financial, human resources and administrative rules and regulations, while operations are run by the Fund’s own independent governance structure. 

Additional information is available at www.educationcannotwait.org

For press enquiries, contact: Anouk Desgroseilliers, adesgroseilliers@educationcannotwait.org , +1 917 640-6820

For any other enquiries, contact: info@educationcannotwait.org  

GOVERNMENT OF GERMANY ANNOUNCES 15 MILLION EUROS PLEDGE FOR EDUCATION CANNOT WAIT

SUSTAINED SUPPORT FROM GERMANY ENSURES QUALITY, RELIABLE EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN LIVING IN THE WORLD’S MOST SERIOUS CRISES

20 November 2018, New York – The Government of Germany announced today a substantial 15 million euros (US$ 17 million) pledge for Education Cannot Wait, a new global fund dedicated to respond rapidly and provide sustainable quality education to millions of children and youth living in crisis worldwide.

The new pledge adds to Germany’s initial 16 million euros ($US18.7 million) contribution to Education Cannot Wait, providing a total of 31 million euros ($35.7 million) in contributions to date and making Germany the third largest donor to the Fund. Today’s announcement is an important milestone for the coalition of donors, United Nations (UN) agencies and civil society partners working together through Education Cannot Wait, as it ensures the Fund reaches its 2018 target – on its way to a total first funding goal to mobilize US$1.8 billion over the 2018-2021 period.

20 November 2018: State Secretary in the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, Martin Jagër, announcing new pledge to Education Cannot Wait  at  the launch of the 2019 Global Education Monitoring Report in Berlin, Germany.   
20 November 2018: State Secretary in the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, Martin Jagër, announcing new pledge to Education Cannot Wait  at  the launch of the 2019 Global Education Monitoring Report in Berlin, Germany. Photo: ECW/ Desgroseilliers

The announcement was made at the launch of UNESCO’s 2019 Global Education Monitoring Report in Berlin, Germany. “Education and training are the keys with which to unlock development. Yet there are still 75 million children and young people caught up in crisis and emergency situations who have no way to get an education. We must act now, with resolution and determination, otherwise they will grow up without any prospects” said Dr. Gerd Müller, the German Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development.

“My goal is to invest 25 per cent of the development ministry’s budget in education and vocational training. As the next step we are launching a special initiative on training and job creation, setting up new training and jobs partnerships with German and African businesses. At the same time we are strengthening the international education fund for children in emergency situations with an investment of 15 million euros. This money will be used to fund school books in Yemen or to support 60,000 children in Indonesia following the devastating tsunami, so that they can still be taught” said Müller.

Education Cannot Wait has reached more than 800,000 children and youth with quality education – of which 364,000 are girls – in 19 crisis-affected countries since it became operational in early 2017. With continued support from donors, the Fund, hosted by UNICEF, will exceed its target with over 1 million children by the end of 2018.

“This generous pledge further confirms the global role of Germany in showing compassion, generosity and concrete support to those furthest left behind. This funding will accelerate our determined joint efforts to reach 8.9 million children and youth in emergencies and protracted crisis by 2021 and fill the US$8.5 billion funding gap for education in crises” said Yasmine Sherif, Director of Education Cannot Wait.

“The millions of children and youth silently struggling in crisis who do not have access to quality education today sustain themselves by dreaming of one. This renewed pledge from the government of Germany may be the realization of that dream. It signals a continued commitment to achieve our goals for equitable education for every boy and girl on the planet by 2030 as outlined in the sustainable development goals” she said.

Education Cannot Wait is the first and only global fund for education in emergencies and protracted crises countries. In partnership with donors, UN agencies, civil society, national governments and other key actors, the Fund is pioneering a new way of working that establishes education as the point of convergence in the humanitarian-development nexus to rapidly deliver agile, well-coordinated and sustainable quality education through collective efforts for children and youth in war zones, emergency areas and other crisis hot spots.

Education Cannot Wait has invested $134.5 million in 19 crisis-affected countries to date. These include 16 First Emergency Response allocations to countries facing sudden-onset or escalating crises, such as a recently announced programme to support children impacted by the tsunami and earthquakes in Indonesia. Four countries have been targeted by Education Cannot Wait’s two-year Initial Investments Programmes to date. The Fund also recently announced its first seed funding to roll out innovative multi-year programmes in Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Uganda, while such mulit-year programmes are also planned in 20 other crisis-affected countries by 2021.

“By catalyzing agile, responsive and jointly planned programmes, education cannot wait ensures taxpayers’ money or strategic donor investments get to the people in need rapidly and sustainably,” Sherif said. “Education Cannot Wait brings all partners together to respond without delay and to remain until every child and young person have benefited from their non-negotiable right to quality education. Refugee, internally displaced or war-affected, both girls and boys, disabled and other-abled, make up the 75 million with a right to education in conflict and disasters. Thanks to Germany’s generous and continued contribution, their right, their dream, may come true.”

Children and youth in fragile and conflict affected countries are 30 per cent less likely to complete primary education and half as likely to complete lower-secondary education than other children. Indeed, conflict widens education inequalities, particularly gender and wealth disparities, derailing global efforts to build a more peaceful world.

“For a little over a $100 a year, a child or an adolescent living and growing up in the abnormal and testing circumstances of conflict and disasters will be able to get the quality education they deserve and need to give them hope, to give them a future,” said Sherif. “Now is the time to invest in these children and youth. Their education cannot wait. If our intention is to make a difference, we need to act today. Because, tomorrow might be too late.”

Contacts for the press:

Education Cannot Wait: Ms. Anouk Desgroseilliers, adesgroseilliers@educationcannotwait.org  +1 917 640-6820

German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development: presse@bmz.bund.de

###

Notes to Editors:

Information on the Education Cannot Wait (ECW) Fund is available at: www.educationcannotwait.org

For more details on ECW’s donors and partners: www.educationcannotwait.org/about-ecw

German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development: www.bmz.de/en/index.html

Download the PDF 

Joint statement on the dire situation of teachers in Yemen

header mailchimo

October 5, 2018 —- The violent conflict in Yemen is severely affecting the education of millions of children throughout the country and takes a heavy toll on teachers.

The war has pushed at least half a million children out of school since 2015, and another 3.7 million are at risk of missing this school year if teachers are not paid.

On World Teachers’ Day with the theme, “The right to education means the right to a qualified teacher”, Education Cannot Wait, the Global Partnership for Education, UNESCO and UNICEF are calling for the resumption of salary payments for the 145,000 Yemeni teachers, who teach children under dire and life-threatening circumstances.

Further delay in paying teachers will likely lead to the collapse of the education sector and impact millions of children in Yemen making them vulnerable to child labor, recruitment into the fighting, trafficking, abuse and early marriage.

Teachers who have not received regular salaries for two years, can no longer meet their most basic needs and have been forced to seek other ways of income to provide for their families.

The global community must unite to end violence against children in Yemen and protect their right to education.

There is no time to waste. An entire generation of children is facing the loss of their education – and their future.

Without our collective commitment and action, we will fail to meet the 2030 Agenda – Leaving no child and no teacher behind.

Education Cannot Wait, the Global Partnership for Education, UNESCO and UNICEF are committed to continuing our support for equitable, inclusive quality education for all Yemeni children.


Download the full statement in English here 

اضغط هنا لتحميل التصريح الكامل باللغة العربية

Télécharger la déclaration complète  ici

 

Powerful speech by Gordon Brown on why we must fund education for refugee children

Full speech of Rt Hon Gordon Brown, United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education & Chair of the ECW High-Level Steering Group (HLSG) on Action for Refugee Education

In 2016 world leaders agreed to strengthen the international response to the global
refugee crisis and grow support to meet the needs of refugee and host communities.
This included promising “to ensure all refugee children are receiving education within a few months of arrival and to prioritize budgetary provision to facilitate this, including support for host countries”.

The new Global Compact on Refugees sets out a Programme of Action which includes commitments to “expand and enhance the quality and inclusiveness of national education systems to facilitate access by refugee and host community children and youth to primary, secondary and tertiary education”. It also commits to “provide more direct financial support to minimize the time refugee boys and girls spend out of education”.
However, more than half of the world’s refugee children – 3.7 million – remain out of school.
Despite this we believe that progress is possible and that having agreed our aims we must act to deliver them.
The High-Level Meeting on Action for Refugee Education will bring together refugee hosting states, donor governments, multilateral institutions, the private sector and civil society to agree how to accelerate and improve efforts to deliver these commitments.
The Meeting will explore efforts to:
• include refugee populations in national education systems
• improve learning outcomes for refugee and host communities
• and support greater responsibility sharing, especially via more and better financing.

Learn more: https://www.actionforrefugeeeducation.net/

 12 YEARS TO BREAK BARRIERS AND LEAVE NO GIRL BEHIND

2018-09-joint-statement-12-years-break-barriers-girls-education 2018-09-declaration-conjointe-12-annees-education-fillesJoint-statement-header

Today, more girls are in school globally than ever before; but 132 million are not, particularly those in emergencies and in conflict-affected and fragile states. Millions more drop out before they complete their education, and progress for the most marginalized girls is far too slow. These girls struggle to learn the basics, and are under-represented in secondary education, where they would gain the skills, knowledge and opportunities for a productive and fulfilling life.

Far too many girls continue to face barriers to their education, across the lifecycle from early years, through adolescence and into adulthood, including poverty; sexual and gender-based violence; child, early and forced marriage; early and unwanted pregnancy; and restrictive social norms and expectations. Other barriers rest within the school, related to deep-rooted gender discrimination, unequal power relations, and inadequate facilities. By some estimates, one in ten girls in sub-Saharan Africa miss school during menstruation. Gender-based violence in, around and on the way to school knows no geographical, cultural, social, economic or ethnic boundaries. Inclusive, equitable education, in safe and secure environments, which reaches the most vulnerable, including children with disabilities, remains fundamental to achieving the empowerment and economic equality of girls and women, especially in developing contexts and countries struggling with conflict.

Today we meet to take stock, to reaffirm and issue new policy and financial commitments, and to agree on next steps for joint advocacy and action to achieve results for all girls.

We acknowledge that much progress has been made in 2018 to make concrete commitments to advancing girls’ enjoyment of their human right to education, and a contribution to social development, economic growth, and the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The G7 Summit in Canada and the Commonwealth Summit in the UK agreed on commitments with a particular focus on supporting adolescent and highly marginalised girls while they confront enduring barriers to their achievement of positive learning outcomes; while the Global Partnership for Education conference in Senegal saw developing countries commit themselves to invest a further $110 billion in education, coupled with $2.3 billion of ODA pledges by donors. Education Cannot Wait, in barely one year, invested close to $100 million in emergency response plans and multi-year resilience programmes in which 50 percent of the beneficiaries are girls and the majority of teachers are female. With 2030 in sight, we must continue the momentum for shared responsibility, global solidarity, and accountability to ensure no girl is left behind.

We together call on girls themselves, their families and communities, governments, international organizations, civil society and the private sector to join us in our commitment to undertake individual and collective action to dismantle barriers to girls’ education, and to:

  • Increase girls’ access to schools and learning pathways, with a focus on the most marginalized, including those in contexts of emergency, conflict and fragility.
  • Provide opportunity for 12 years of free, safe and quality education that promotes gender equality, builds literacy and numeracy skills, and skills for life and the jobs of the future.

To close existing gaps, we resolve to:

  • Promote gender-responsive education systems, including plans and policies, budgeting, teaching and learning approaches, curriculum and learning materials;
  • Improve coordination between humanitarian assistance and development cooperation, ensuring commitment to gender equality and prioritizing improved access to quality education for girls and women in the early stages of humanitarian response and peacebuilding efforts;
  • Enact and enforce legislation, providing opportunity for 12 years of free basic education, and dismantling barriers to education through wider reform, such as on child, early and forced marriage;
  • Invest in teachers, creating incentives for male and female teachers to provide quality learning opportunities, and expanding professional development in gender-responsive teaching practice;
  • Focus on the hardest to reach girls, including girls in situations of conflict, crisis and fragility, rural girls, and girls with disabilities;
  • Champion schools as safe spaces for learning, free of gender bias, violence and discrimination;
  • Engage communities, parents, boys and men, and girls themselves to challenge the patriarchal beliefs, practices, institutions and structures that drive gender inequality;
  • Monitor progress, and ensure the collection of sex-and age-disaggregated data on a regular basis and its use to redress gender disparities in education and their causes across the lifecycle;
  • Implement integrated and multi-sectoral approaches which empower adolescents to avoid sexual risks and prevent early pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections;
  • Prepare girls for jobs of the future, building digital skills and closing gender gaps in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education.
  • Strengthen international, regional, national, and South-South cooperation to champion girls’ education and make gender equality in and through education a reality.

We commit to galvanizing political will to deliver on the SDG 4 commitments to girls’ education and use upcoming events such as the Global Education 2030 Meeting organized by UNESCO in December 2018 and the SDG High Level Political Forum in July 2019 to take stock of progress in the count down to 2030.

25 September 2018

 

Download PDF: ENGLISH


 

DOUZE ANS POUR SUPPRIMER LES OBSTACLES ET NE LAISSER AUCUNE FILLE DE CȎTÉ

 

 Jamais autant de filles n’ont été scolarisées dans le monde. Toutefois, 132 millions de filles ne vont toujours pas à l’école, en particulier dans les États fragiles, en situation d’urgence ou en proie à des conflits. Des millions d’autres filles quittent l’école prématurément, tandis que les progrès enregistrés pour les plus marginalisées d’entre elles sont encore bien trop lents. Pour ces filles, acquérir les compétences fondamentales est un véritable combat. Elles demeurent en outre sous-représentées dans l’enseignement secondaire, où elles pourraient pourtant acquérir les connaissances et les compétences nécessaires pour construire une existence riche et accomplie.

Les filles et les femmes sont encore beaucoup trop nombreuses à rencontrer des obstacles à leur éducation, tout au long de leur vie, de la petite enfance à l’âge adulte, en passant par l’adolescence : pauvreté, violences sexuelles ou liées au genre, mariages d’enfants, précoces ou forcés, grossesses précoces ou non désirées, ainsi que des normes et des attentes sociales trop restrictives. L’institution scolaire elle-même maintient un certain nombre de barrières : discriminations fondées sur le genre, relations de pouvoir inégalitaires et infrastructures inadaptées. Selon certaines estimations, une fille sur dix, en Afrique subsaharienne, manque l’école pendant ses menstruations. Les violences liées au genre à l’intérieur, aux abords ou sur le chemin de l’école ne connaissent pas de frontières géographiques, culturelles, sociales, économiques ou ethniques. Il demeure donc essentiel d’assurer les conditions d’une école inclusive et équitable, d’une éducation dispensée dans un environnement sain et sûr, qui inclut les plus vulnérables, y compris les enfants en situation de handicap. Il s’agit de rendre les filles et les femmes autonomes, y compris sur le plan économique, en particulier dans les pays en développement et en situation de conflits.

Nous sommes aujourd’hui réunis pour prendre la mesure de cette situation, pour affirmer à nouveau notre volonté d’avancer, pour définir de nouvelles mesures et des engagements financiers et pour convenir d’actions communes afin de garantir des résultats pour toutes les filles.

Convenons-en, de nombreux progrès ont été accomplis en 2018. Des engagements concrets ont été pris afin de garantir que les filles puissent jouir pleinement de leur droit à l’éducation, un droit fondamental contribuant au développement social, à la croissance économique et à la réalisation des objectifs de développement durable (ODD). Les Sommets du G-7 au Canada et du Commonwealth au Royaume-Uni ont débouché sur des engagements précis, notamment en faveur des adolescentes et des filles les plus marginalisées, tandis que la Conférence du Partenariat mondial pour l’éducation organisée au Sénégal a vu les pays en développement s’engager à investir 110 milliards de dollars supplémentaires dans l’éducation, auxquels s’ajoutent 2,3 milliards de dollars de la part de donateurs. Education Cannot Wait / Éducation ne peut pas attendre a investi en à peine un an près de 100 millions de dollars dans des plans d’intervention d’urgence et des programmes pluriannuels de résilience dans lesquels 50% des bénéficiaires sont des filles, et la majorité des enseignants des femmes. Dans la perspective de l’échéance de 2030, nous devons entretenir cette dynamique en faveur d’une responsabilité commune, d’une solidarité mondiale et d’un principe de redevabilité, pour faire en sorte qu’aucune fille ne soit laissée de côté.

Ensemble, nous appelons les filles elles-mêmes, ainsi que leurs familles et communautés respectives, les gouvernements, les organisations internationales, la société civile, le secteur privé, tous les acteurs de l’éducation, à s’engager avec nous, et à agir, à titre individuel ou collectif, pour lever les obstacles à l’éducation des filles et pour :

 

  • améliorer l’accès des filles à l’éducation et aux parcours d’apprentissage, en ciblant les plus marginalisées d’entre elles, notamment celles qui se trouvent dans des situations d’urgence, de conflit ou de vulnérabilité ;
  • assurer 12 années d’un enseignement gratuit, sûr et de qualité, qui s’attache à promouvoir l’égalité de genre et à renforcer les compétences en matière d’écriture, de lecture et de calcul, ainsi que les compétences nécessaires à la vie quotidienne et aux métiers de demain.

 

Afin de combler les écarts qui existent, nous sommes déterminés à :

 

  • promouvoir des systèmes éducatifs prenant en compte les questions de genre, notamment en matière de planification, de réglementation, de budget, d’approches et de ressources pédagogiques et de programmes d’enseignement ;
  • améliorer la coordination entre l’aide humanitaire et la coopération pour le développement, en garantissant un engagement de tous les acteurs en faveur de l’égalité de genre, et en faisant de l’accès à une éducation de qualité pour les filles et les femmes une priorité dès les premiers moments de l’intervention humanitaire et les premiers efforts pour instaurer la paix ;
  • promulguer et faire appliquer des lois permettant d’assurer 12 années d’un enseignement de base gratuit et de lever les obstacles à l’éducation, grâce à des réformes plus larges, portant par exemple sur les mariages d’enfants, précoces et forcés ;
  • investir dans les enseignants en mettant en place des mesures incitatives pour que les enseignants, hommes et femmes, puissent bénéficier de conditions d’apprentissage de qualité et soient formés aux pratiques pédagogiques qui intègrent une perspective de genre;
  • se concentrer sur les filles les plus marginalisées, notamment celles qui se trouvent en situation de conflit, de crise ou de vulnérabilité, celles qui vivent en milieu rural et celles qui ont un handicap ;
  • promouvoir les écoles en tant que lieux d’apprentissage sûrs, exempts de préjugés, de violences ou de discriminations liées au genre ;
  • encourager les communautés, les parents, les garçons et les hommes, ainsi que les filles elles-mêmes, à remettre en question les croyances, les pratiques, les institutions et les structures patriarcales qui favorisent les inégalités de genre ;
  • suivre les progrès et assurer la collecte de données réparties par sexe et par âge de manière régulière, et suivre l’utilisation de ces données pour remédier aux inégalités fondées sur le genre dans l’éducation ;

 

  • adopter des approches intégrées et multisectorielles qui donnent aux adolescentes les moyens d’éviter les risques liés à la sexualité et de prévenir les grossesses précoces et les maladies sexuellement transmissibles ;
  • préparer les filles aux métiers de demain, développer leurs compétences dans le domaine du numérique et combler l’écart entre filles et garçons dans l’enseignement des sciences, de la technologie, de l’ingénierie et des mathématiques ;
  • resserrer la coopération internationale, régionale, nationale et Sud-Sud pour promouvoir l’éducation des filles et faire en sorte que l’égalité de genre dans et par l’éducation devienne une réalité.

 

Nous sommes déterminés à mobiliser les volontés politiques en vue de la réalisation des engagements de l’ODD 4 en faveur de l’éducation des filles, ainsi qu’à mettre à profit les grandes manifestations à venir, telles que la Réunion mondiale Éducation 2030 organisée par l’UNESCO en décembre 2018 et le Forum politique de haut niveau consacré aux ODD en 2019 pour dresser un bilan des progrès accomplis au regard de l’échéance de 2030.

 

25 septembre 2018

Download PDF: FRENCH

EDUCATION CANNOT WAIT ANNOUNCES US$35 MILLION ALLOCATION

 ECW provides its largest allocation to date to support quality education for 1.6 million crisis-affected children and youth in Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Uganda

20 September 2018, New York – The Education Cannot Wait fund (ECW) is allocating a total of US$35 million as seed funding to support the launch of three ground-breaking multi-year education programmes designed to deliver quality learning opportunities to 1.6 million children and youth affected by conflict and violence.

This is the largest allocation from the ECW Fund since its inception. It comprises $11 million to support the Education Response Plan for Refugees and Host communities in Uganda, $12 million allocated to the Delivering Collective Education Outcomes in Afghanistan programme, and $12 million to support Education for Rohingya Refugees and Host Communities in Bangladesh.

“The launch of these three multi-year programmes marks a turning point in the way the multilateral aid system delivers education in emergencies and protracted crises,” said Education Cannot Wait Director Yasmine Sherif. “It sets concrete examples of ‘the new way of working’ through cooperation and collaboration between humanitarian and development actors. It is about all coming together, about how global, national and local stakeholders join forces to find solutions to provide quality education and restore hope to millions of children and youth caught up in some of the most difficult circumstances of conflict and displacement.”

ECW is pioneering the new way of working in the education-in-emergencies sector to strengthen the links between relief and development efforts, and deliver rapid and sustainable responses to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 4. The Fund provided the impetus and supported the development by in-country partners of the three multi-year programmes, acting as a catalyst to bring together humanitarian and development actors.

“The announcement of ECW’s allocation today is the starting line. In order to deliver on our collective obligation to fulfill the right to education of all children in conflict and crisis, public and private donors must deepen and expand their investment specifically addressing education in humanitarian contexts,” said Sherif. “Valued stakeholders and donors have already indicated their support to these ECW-facilitated programmes, and we are confident additional actors will come forward and contribute.”

The three ECW-facilitated multi-year education programmes aim to provide quality education to refugees, internally displaced, and host community and vulnerable children and youth as follows:

  • In Uganda: The 3.5-year programme calls for contributions of $389 million to reach over 560,000 refugee and host community children and youth, recruit and remunerate more than 9,000 teachers on a yearly basis, train over 12,500 teachers and build close to 3,000 classrooms yearly. The response plan has been developed under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports and UNHCR, and will be managed by consortium facilitated by Save the Children. Other key partners include UN Agencies, bilateral donors, and international and local civil society organizations. To date, $80 million in contributions from the Government and its partners has been identified, including ECW’s seed funding.

In Afghanistan: The 3-year programme calls for contributions of $150 million to reach over 500,000 internally displaced and returnee children and youth as well as vulnerable children in remote areas and host communities. It will create an inclusive teaching and learning environment; improve continuity of education; and create safer and more protective learning environments, with a target of 50 per cent towards girls’ access to quality education. The key partners facilitating the programme under the leadership of the Ministry of Education include UNICEF, Save the Children, UN agencies, bilateral donors, and international and local civil society organizations. To date, $22 million in contributions has been allocated to the programme, including ECW’s seed funding.

  • In Bangladesh: The 2-year framework calls for contributions of $222 million to build on the existing emergency response and reach over 560,000 refugee and host community children and youth and 9,800 teachers in Cox’s Bazar district. It is an extension of the humanitarian response and is therefore aligned with the current Joint Response Plan. Key partners who have participated in the development of this framework include UNHCR, UNESCO, UNICEF, and international and local civil society organizations. To date over $97 million has been allocated towards the framework, including ECW’s seed funding..

This $35 million allocation brings ECW’s investments to a total of $127 million in 17 crisis-affected countries since the Fund became operational eighteen months ago. ECW’s investments are currently reaching 765,000 children and youth in the world’s worst crises, half of whom are girls and adolescent girls. The number of children and youth reached will now scale up significantly.

The full press release is available here.

Statement by Rt Hon Gordon Brown on the Launch of the Education Response Plan for Refugees and Host Communities in Uganda

Statement by Rt Hon Gordon Brown, United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education & Chair of the ECW High-Level Steering Group (HLSG)

Today marks an important milestone in the way that the international community, together with host governments, address the crisis situation of the 75 million children and youth in armed conflict, refugee camps, natural disasters and countries affected by epidemics deprived of their right to a quality education.   These children and their education, traditionally left behind, are now not only at the center of humanitarian response and will also be supported by a new way of working: supporting the delivery of education in the humanitarian-development nexus.

Following the Uganda Solidarity Summit on Refugees of June last year, the Government of Uganda, together with local and international humanitarian and development partners, have worked to complete an Education Response Plan for over half million refugees from South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), and other countries.  Together with students from Ugandan host communities, who have been very supportive of their refugee peers, we now have plan to deliver education in a true partnership.   While the total cost of the three and a half year plan is USD 389 million, I am happy to report that Education Cannot Wait will be working to provide significant seed funding towards this programme.

I take this opportunity to sincerely thank my dear friend, Uganda’s Minister of Education and Sports, Janet Museveni,  for her leadership and support to this comprehensive, joint plan, bringing together the in international donor agencies, UN agencies, and NGOs who have worked to make the plan a reality.

– Gordon Brown

Extended Resources

Photo

UNHCR monthly update highlights details of Education Response Plan
The Education Response Plan for Refugees and Host Communities in Uganda (ERP) was launched in Kampala on 14 September 2018 by the Minister for Education and Sports, Her Excellency Mrs. Janet Museveni, the First Lady of Uganda.

This Plan is the first of its kind worldwide and represents a huge policy step forward for refugee education globally. Speaking at this Launch Event, as above, included the
Minister for Education and Sports; Alex Kakooza (Permanent Secretary MoES); Minister Hilary Onek (Minister for Relief, Disaster Preparedness and Refugees), Aggrey Kibenge (Under Secretary MoES), Rosa Malango (UN Resident Coordinator), Joel Boutroue (UNHCR Representative); Jennie Barugh (Former Head of DFID),
Yasmine Sherif (Global Director of Education Cannot Wait) and refugee teacher, Dumba Lawrence David from Bidibidi Settlement in Yumbe District.

The Plan sets out a vision where all refugee children, as well as host community children, have access to quality learning at all levels, including pre-primary, primary, secondary and non-formal education.

The ERP targets children and youth in 12 refugee-hosting districts in Uganda
where more than half a million children are currently out of learning and out of school.” – UNHCR Monthly Update

Learn More

ECW Announces Resource Mobilization Challenge Finalists

New York, 10 September 2018 – The Education Cannot Wait (ECW) fund is delighted to reveal the fundraising ideas selected for the final of its resource mobilization challenge. These ideas – submitted by seven individuals, social entrepreneurs and civil society organisations – have been identified as the best ones among the almost 200 submissions received from all over the world.

Ideas were nominated based on their innovative character, their potential to mobilize millions of dollars to fund education programmes for children and young people in crisis settings, as well as their feasibility, implementation cost and associated risks.

Finalists will have 10 minutes to pitch their ideas to the Challenge Jury during a livestreamed event on Friday 21 September from 7:30 am to 9:00 am (EST). Jury members will then deliberate in a closed session to select the best ideas to be awarded the three $25,000 funding prizes destined to support the development of business plans.

The three best ideas will be announced at the Global People’s Summit on 22 September on the margins of the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly.

 

Finalists for the ECW Resource Mobilization Challenge are:

 

  • Global Investment Fund by Yasser Bentaibi, 4usConsulting, from Morocco Waqf (charitable endowment) which would invest in economic empowerment programmes. The profit generated would be used to support education in emergencies.

 

  • Charity Motivation App by Lisa Biermann from Germany App users can set goals for behavior change for themselves. Whenever users do not achieve their goals they must pay a fee that would be donated to education in emergencies.

 

  • Education in Emergencies Coin by John Gravel from the USA ECW would issue a new cryptocurrency and receive funding through its Initial Coin Offering (ICO), a “tax” on “mining” new coins, and issuing emergency coins that would work like a parametric insurance.

 

  • Reverse Debt Conversion by Richard R. Murray from the USA The idea is to convert defaulted U.S. credit card debt to fund both education in emergencies and partial payments to creditors in return for the creditors deleting negative information from debtors’ credit reports.

 

  • Kanelbullar by Richard R. Murray from the USA IKEA would dedicate its sales from kanelbullar (cinnamon rolls) on Tuesdays, its slowest retail day, to fund education in emergencies.

 

  • College Endowment Excise Tax by Richard R. Murray from the USA Wealthy U.S. colleges would enroll students from crisis-affected countries, which would provide the colleges with a strategy for avoiding/reducing millions of dollars from the new federal excise tax on their endowments.

 

  • Global Lottery on Mobile Phones by Michael Makwani, Randy Mulinge, and Amina Mwatu from Kenya A share of the proceeds of the lottery would be donated to education in emergencies.

 

  • Every Child Needs a School – Book Industry supports ECW by Mary Muchena- Stredwick and Rachel Stredwick from the United Kingdom International book publishers, retailers, and authors would sign-up to contribute up to 1 percent of the net sale of book purchases to the ECW Fund.

 

  • 1-in-9 Fund by Brock Warner, War Child Canada, from Canada Establish a publicly traded investment fund which would direct a share of the fund’s management fees to support children and youth affected by conflict and crisis. 1 in 9 children are living in a war-affected country.

 

ECW congratulates all finalists for their bold ideas and the quality of their submissions! ECW also extends its sincere appreciation to all those who participated in the Resource Mobilization Challenge.

Our team was impressed by the creativity and variety of ideas that were submitted. It is our hope that the engagement of contestants for the cause of education in emergencies will continue well beyond this challenge.

Read the full Press Release here: Press Release – Resource Mobilization Challenge Finalists

Video

 

Will Smith is bungee-jumping for the cause of Education Cannot Wait!

WillSmithBungeeJump

World renowned American actor Will Smith will be bungee-jumping on his 50th birthday to raise funds for the education of girls, boys and youth who live in conflicts and crises!

Will Smith is inviting his fans to donate funds to support his jump from a helicopter over the Grand Canyon for his anniversary on 25 September. Returns of the campaign will be allocated to the Education Cannot Wait (ECW) fund through Global Citizen who is partnering with the Will and Jada Smith Family Foundation on this initiative.

 

Will Smith believes “every child should have access to the transformative power of an education, which provides the chance to thrive, live and succeed”. His dedication to empowering disadvantaged children and youth spans over two decades through the foundation he and his wife set up.  ECW is excited and extremely grateful for this opportunity to help extend Will Smith’s long-lasting commitment to education to the children and youth caught in some of the world’s worst crises.

“Will Smith’s bungee-jumping to campaign for our most critical contemporary cause: education in conflict and crisis countries, is a sheer demonstration of courage which should be an inspiration to all” says ECW Director, Yasmine Sherif.  “We need courage and bold action to set the course straight and close the education gap that leaves behind 75 million children and youth whose education is disrupted by crisis.”

ECW extends it gratitude to Global Citizen who has been a strong advocate for the Fund since its inception and has helped facilitate this fantastic opportunity!

To learn more about the Will Smith bungee-jumping campaign and participate, visit: https://www.omaze.com/experiences/will-smith-birthday-bungee

More information on Global Citizen’s advocacy for education is available at: https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/issue/education/

Will Smith – The Power of 100


 

Videos

 

GLOBAL DISABILITY SUMMIT 2018: Education Cannot Wait commits to ensure disabled children in crisis settings fulfill their right to learn

New York, 24 July 2018 – Education Cannot Wait (ECW) is proud to sign the Global Disability Summit 2018 Charter for change. As a global fund for education in emergencies, ECW’s overarching goal is to support the delivery of quality education to the millions of children and youth whose schooling is disrupted due to conflict and natural disasters – with special attention to disabled children and youth.

Our investment modalities are geared to reach the furthest behind – those who fall between the cracks of the aid system and yet, are among the most in need. This is particularly true for disabled children and youth who become even more vulnerable in the face of conflict and natural disasters.

As crisis shuts down education systems and destroys infrastructures, temporary learning spaces may be inaccessible to disabled children and youth, or available teachers may lack the necessary training to address their needs. Some families may choose to no longer send disabled children to school due depleted financial means. And what’s more, children and youth in crisis are at greater risk of becoming disabled as they are more susceptible to be injured by landmines, small arms and heavy weapons or to suffer from the lack of medical care.

Hanaa, 8, who was paralysed by an exploding bomb and lost the use of her legs, solves a problem on a whiteboard in a classroom at a school in east Aleppo city, Syrian Arab Republic, February 2018. Hanaa's dream is to become a physiotherapist to help children like her. ©UNICEF/Al-Issa
Hanaa, 8, who was paralysed by an exploding bomb and lost the use of her legs, solves a problem on a whiteboard in a classroom at a school in east Aleppo city, Syrian Arab Republic, in February 2018. Hanaa’s dream is to become a physiotherapist to help children like her.
©UNICEF/Al-Issa

ECW is committed to addressing and reducing these vulnerabilities and upholding the right of all children to learn. Our investments have a clear focus on equity, ensuring that ECW-supported education programmes address the needs of children and youth with disabilities in crisis settings.

During ECW’s first year of operations – from April 2017 to March 2018 – children and youth with disabilities were specifically targeted in 6 out of our 14 countries of investment. Results are already promising: in a country like Uganda, where estimates of child disability prevalence range from 2 to 10 per cent, disabled children and youth accounted for up to 7 per cent of all children reached through ECW-supported programmes!

Ensuring that disabled children and youth have access to education is not only a moral and legal obligation; it is a sound investment in human development, livelihoods, poverty reduction and social cohesion. People with disabilities are resilient and have other abilities, which may be developed and manifested through quality education. As experience tells us, those furthest left behind often prove to be the most resilient.

I will never forget 10-year-old Siddiqula whom I met in 1991 in an ICRC hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan. He lost both his legs to a landmine while playing with friends under a tree. Yet, he was determined and smiled out of gratitude that his life was saved. He had a rare ability: to experience inner strength and gratitude in the face of great adversity. For someone like Siddiqula, education is a powerful means to harness his strength and drive positive change, not only in his own life, but for his whole community.

Through the Charter for Change, together, let’s join forces to ensure these opportunities are not lost!

Yasmine Sherif
Director
Education Cannot Wait (ECW)

More information on ECW’s commitments and achievements in reaching children and youth with disabilities in crisis settings is available in our 2018 -2021 Strategic Plan and our 2017 – 2018 Results Report.   

For further details on the Global Disability Summit – Charter for change, consulthttps://www.gov.uk/government/publications/global-disability-summit-charter-for-change