EDUCATION CANNOT WAIT ALLOCATES ADDITIONAL US$7.8 MILLION TO SUPPORT EDUCATION RESPONSES FOR CHILDREN IMPACTED BY CYCLONE SEASON IN MALAWI, MOZAMBIQUE AND ZIMBABWE

Education Cannot Wait is expanding its recovery support for communities affected by the devastating cyclone season in Southern Africa with an additional US$7.8 million in funding for education responses for children in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe.

In Mozambique 3,500 classrooms were destroyed by the cyclones. Education Cannot Wait’s funding covers close to 9 per cent of the education sector funding gaps in Malawi and Zimbabwe and 11 per cent of the gap in Mozambique. Photo Manan Kotak/ECW

FUNDING WILL SUPPORT THE RECOVERY OF COMMUNITIES IMPACTED BY CYCLONE IDAI AND CYCLONE KENNETH

3 July 2019, New York – Education Cannot Wait is expanding its recovery support for communities affected by the devastating cyclone season in Southern Africa with an additional US$7.8 million in funding for education responses for children in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe.

This is the second tranche of funding announced by Education Cannot Wait to respond to the destruction caused by Cyclone Idai in the three countries. In Mozambique, the funding includes a $360,000 allocation to provide education support to children and youth affected by Cyclone Kenneth which pummeled through the country just a few weeks after Cyclone Idai.

This new funding allocation brings Education Cannot Wait’s total support to emergency responses in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe to almost US$15 million to date, including contributions from the United Kingdom’s Department of International Development (DFID) and Dubai Cares.

“This additional support from Education Cannot Wait for the children affected by the catastrophic cyclone season in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe helps to ensure education is a top priority for aid stakeholders throughout the various phases of crisis, from the immediate emergency response to longer-term recovery,” said Yasmine Sherif, Director of Education Cannot Wait. “Speed, continuity and sustainability of interventions are crucial for children to achieve quality learning and for education to play its role as a stepping-stone for children and communities to recover and build back better after disaster.”  

Cyclone Idai wreaked vast devastation across the three countries in March. Mozambique was hardest hit by the cyclone and subsequent flooding. Estimates indicate over 3,500 classrooms were destroyed, affecting more than 300,000 students and 7,800 teachers. Children not only lost their homes but were also displaced and in some cases lost family members, friends, classmates and teachers in the disaster. Just a few weeks later, Cyclone Kenneth also hit Mozambique, leaving close to 250,000 people in need of assistance, including 42,000 school-aged children.

Education Cannot Wait’s second funding tranche for the response to Cyclone Idai supports inter-agency humanitarian appeals in the three countries. It includes US$1.2 million in grant funding for Malawi, US$5 million for Mozambique, and US$1.2 million for Zimbabwe. The funding covers close to 9 per cent of the education sector funding gaps in Malawi and Zimbabwe and 11 per cent of the gap in Mozambique.

Building upon the initial funding announced by Education Cannot Wait in April and May to support the response to Cyclone Idai, these additional grants will reach more than 185,000 children across the three countries: 41,491 children in Malawi (20,732 girls); 107,266 children (49,041 girls) in Mozambique and 36,350 children (18,085 girls) in Zimbabwe.

In Mozambique, the new US$360,000 grant to support the response to Cyclone Kenneth is also aligned with the inter-agency humanitarian appeal and will reach an additional 15,000 children (7,500 girls).

Grants to United Nations agencies and international NGOs will be used to support a wide range of partners, including national governments, local NGOs and communities impacted by the cyclones and are aligned with national education sector plans.

Programmes will support access to safe and protective learning environments for affected girls and boys through a wide range of context-specific activities across the three countries. These include: establishing temporary learning spaces; rehabilitating schools; supplying educational materials and recreation kits; school feeding programmes, training and support for teachers to deal with disasters and crisis in schools and community; promoting back-to-school and live-saving messaging; promoting hygiene education and psychosocial support by teachers; and, support to disaster preparedness and disaster management.

LINKS

  • Learn more about Education Cannot Wait’s emergency education response for Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe
  • Meet Maria Alberto, a courageous teacher supporting the recovery of children in Mozambique in our story Portraits of Resilience

EDUCATION CANNOT WAIT AND PARTNERS ANNOUNCE ALLOCATION OF US$14 MILLION FOR THE VICTIMS OF CYCLONE IDAI IN MALAWI, MOZAMBIQUE AND ZIMBABWE

DFID, DUBAI CARES AND EDUCATION CANNOT WAIT COME TOGETHER TO DELIVER EMERGENCY EDUCATION RESPONSES TO MORE THAN 500,000 CHILDREN AND YOUTH

On 1 April 2019 in Mozambique, Leonora Jose, 12, and her friend Olga Romao, 11 poses for a portrait in a classroom that has no roof at the Escola Primeria de Ndunda de Ndunda, in Manga, Beira. Mozambique. The school was badly damaged during Cyclone Idai and resumed activities in some of the classrooms on 27 March 2019. Tropical cyclone Idai, carrying heavy rains and winds of up to 170km/h (106mp/h) made landfall at the port of Beira, Mozambique’s fourth largest city, on Thursday 14 March 2019, leaving the 500,000 residents without power and communications lines down. As at 1 pril 2019, at least 140,784 people have been displaced from Cyclone Idai and the severe flooding. Most of the displaced are hosted in 161 transit centers set up in Sofala, Manica, Zambezia and Tete provinces. As of 31 March, 517 cholera cases and one death have been reported, including 246 cases on 31 March alone with 211 cases from one bairo. Eleven cholera treatment centres (CTC) have been set up (seven are already functional) to address cholera in Sofala. UNICEF supported the Health provincial directorate to install the CTC in Macurungo and Ponta Gea in Beira city, providing five tents, cholera beds and medicines to treat at least 6,000 people. UNICEF has procured and shipped 884,953 doses of Oral Cholera Vaccine (OCV) that will arrive in Beira on 01 April to support the OCV vaccination campaign expected to start on 3 April. With support of UNICEF and DFID, the water supply system in Beira resumed its operations on 22 March providing water to about 300,000 people. UNICEF has been supporting the FIPAG-water supply operator with fuel – 9,000 liters of fuel per day, and the provision of chemicals for water treatment. Water supply systems for Sussundenga and Nhamatanda small towns have also been re-established.
On 1 April 2019 in Mozambique, Leonora Jose, 12, and her friend Olga Romao, 11, pose for a portrait in a classroom that has no roof at the Escola Primeria de Ndunda de Ndunda, in Manga, Beira. Mozambique. The school was badly damaged during Cyclone Idai and resumed activities in some of the classrooms on 27 March 2019. Photo: Cyclone Idai, Mozambique, © UNICEF/UN0294994/DE WET

DFID, DUBAI CARES AND EDUCATION CANNOT WAIT COME TOGETHER TO DELIVER EMERGENCY EDUCATION RESPONSES TO MORE THAN 500,000 CHILDREN AND YOUTH

11 April 2019, Washington – Education Cannot Wait, the United Kingdom’s Department of International Development (DFID) and Dubai Cares announced today new commitments of up to US$14 million in funds to support educational responses in the wake of the devastation from Cyclone Idai, which caused widespread destruction and displaced hundreds of thousands of people in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe.

Out of the total allocation, the Education Cannot Wait Global Trust Fund is providing US$7 million from its emergency reserve, DFID is providing up to US$5.2 million (4 million pounds) and Dubai Cares is providing US$2 million against the emergency education response facilitated by Education Cannot Wait and coordinated by the Education Cluster.

The funds will help restore education services for an estimated total of 500,000 children and youth.

With entire communities uprooted, missing or deceased caregivers, and schools destroyed or being used as temporary shelters, children across the cyclone-affected countries have had their education disrupted and are instead grappling with trauma. They are also vulnerable to abuse, exploitation and gender-based violence, and face the risk of cholera, among other scourges.

In Mozambique alone, the disaster has affected 1.8 million people and destroyed over 3,300 classrooms, leaving 263,000 children out-of-school. In Zimbabwe, close to 150 schools have been impacted, affecting an estimated 60,000 children. In Malawi, an estimated 200 schools have been impacted.

“We have all seen images of the terrible suffering and devastation caused by Cyclone Idai. The UK has, from the start, led the way in supporting the victims of this destruction and the fresh funding I am announcing will provide further help where it is most needed, right now,” said DFID’s Secretary of State, Penny Mordaunt.

Matthew Rycroft, DFID Permanent Secretary, shared DFID's commitments at the Education Cannot Wait High Level Steering Group meeting today on the margins of the World Bank Spring Meeting (Photo Elias Bahaa/ECW)
Matthew Rycroft, DFID Permanent Secretary, shared DFID’s commitments at the Education Cannot Wait High Level Steering Group meeting today on the margins of the World Bank Spring Meeting (Photo Bahaa Elias/ECW)

The First Emergency Responses in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe will focus on supporting needs assessments, establishing temporary learning spaces, providing learning materials, supporting communities to get children back to school, giving teachers the tools, training and support they need to provide psycho-social support for the children in their care, and supporting governments to build back better.

“The loss of life, destruction and suffering that has resulted from Cyclone Idai is heartbreaking. Children, the most vulnerable victims of any disaster, are at the moment facing tremendous distress and uncertainty. Our partnership with Education Cannot Wait, allows us to quickly respond to this emergency and help reestablish access to education,” said Tariq Al Gurg, Chief Executive Officer at Dubai Cares.

Dubai Cares (1)s
Dubai Cares CEO Tariq Al Gurg at the Education Cannot Wait High Level Steering Group (Photo Bahaa Elias/ECW)

Funds will be allocated against the emergency appeals launched by the governments of the affected-countries with the support of United Nations agencies and NGOs providing relief on the ground.

“A sudden and unexpected natural disaster of this magnitude causes immense human suffering. It demands an immediate response. For a child or adolescent, the losses are especially devastating,” said Yasmine Sherif, Director of Education Cannot Wait. “Unless education services are given priority, the suffering will be prolonged and cause deeper disruption and trauma in their lives. I am deeply grateful to DFID and Dubai Cares for setting a shining example: they moved swiftly together with ECW to provide a coordinated and speedy response in partnership with Ministries of Education, the affected communities, the Education Cluster, UN agencies and Non-Governmental Organizations to reduce suffering and restore hope when these children and youth need it the most.”

DUBAI CARES COMMITTED TO CONTINUE INVESTING IN EDUCATION IN EMERGENCIES

Tariq Al Gurg shaking hands with Gordon Brown.
Tariq Al Gurg shaking hands with Gordon Brown.

PARTNER VOICES Q&A

‘EVERY CHILD IS BORN EQUAL AND EDUCATION IS EVERY CHILD’S BIRTH RIGHT’

A founding partner of Education Cannot Wait, Dubai Cares remains committed to funding education in emergencies through its growing global portfolio of philanthropic investments. With a total US$6.8 million in current contributions over four years, the philanthropic organization is a key contributor to the Education Cannot Wait global resource mobilization efforts, which focus on working with the private and philanthropic sectors, bilateral and multilateral donors, United Nations and civil society organizations, and country-level partners. Dubai Cares was a first responder joining Education Cannot Wait to rapidly fund the Rohingya refugees when arriving in Cox’s Bazaar in Bangladesh in the early fall of 2017, providing an additional half-million US dollars to the Fund to allow for an immediate response to the emergency.

Through this broad coalition of stakeholders, Education Cannot Wait aims to mobilize US$1.8 billion by 2021 to reach 8.9 million children living in crisis and emergencies with quality education. Funding for education in emergencies has been historically low, but is slowly on the rise, with supporters like Dubai Cares helping to advocate for a global response to the glaring needs of children and youth caught in situations of crisis. In 2013, education in emergencies accounted for just 2 per cent of humanitarian aid. In 2018, it accounted for 4 per cent. Nevertheless, a major deficit remains and 75 million children living in crisis are still in need of educational support.

We connected with the CEO of Dubai Cares, Tariq Al Gurg, to learn more about the foundation’s key role in education in emergencies and why they’ve decided to dedicate a third of their resources to fill the gap that’s left millions of children behind worldwide. A leading global advocate for increased visibility and support for children left behind in fragile and crisis-affected countries, Al Gurg has been recognized by Irina Bokova, former director of UNESCO, for his role in transitioning Dubai Cares from a young philanthropic organization into a global leader in the international education arena.

Q. Dubai Cares is a founding partner of Education Cannot Wait, and a generous funder of the Fund’s efforts to deliver safe and reliable education to millions of children and youth living in emergencies and protracted crisis. As a foundation, can you tell us why Dubai Cares decided to invest its energies, resources and talents into the new global Fund?

A. As a philanthropic organization with no operational presence on the ground and limited direct access to populations in need in emergency and protracted crisis contexts, it is important for us that we support the partners best placed in each context to help deliver education to those most in need. The establishment of Education Cannot Wait as a new global fund for education in emergencies allows foundations like us to support a mechanism that enables improved delivery of education to children and young people displaced by conflicts, epidemics and natural disasters through a coordinated and collaborative effort that minimizes transaction costs and maximizes impact.

As a member of the High-Level Steering Group for Education Cannot Wait, Dubai Cares contributes to leveraging additional finance and catalyzing new approaches to funding and innovation to deliver education in emergencies and protracted crises. As a foundation representative, Dubai Cares aims to highlight the role foundations can play in supporting the global education in emergencies ecosystem and bridge the gap between traditional humanitarian funding mechanisms and private and philanthropic donors.

By supporting the secretariat costs of Education Cannot Wait, Dubai Cares remains committed towards increasing its effort to support the delivery of education in emergencies with the hope of reaching all crisis-affected children and youth with safe, free and quality education.

Q. Why is access to education for children living in crisis and conflict important for the economic future of our world in general? What do you think is the role of foundations and philanthropy in supporting quality learning for children and youth in crisis settings?

A. Never before in humankind’s history has the urgency for education in emergencies been more important. The positive impact of education on societies and future generations is undeniable. Education in emergencies and protracted crises has the power to provide physical, psychosocial, and cognitive protection that can sustain and save children’s lives.  Also, education in emergencies can help child soldiers, internally displaced persons, refugees and all those affected by emergencies to reintegrate back into society, and overcome the negative effects that emergencies can have on people. Schools can provide safe spaces for children to build friendships, play and learn. In addition, there is sufficient empirical evidence to prove the positive economic impact of education, as for every extra year a refugee child spends in school, their future income increases by 3 per cent.

Foundations and philanthropic organizations are not always best placed to fund emergency response interventions, whether in education or other sectors. Financing for education in emergencies must be quick. It must be available for immediate disbursement and be integrated into the existing humanitarian financing mechanisms; long-term and continuous; flexible and allocated to unconventional and traditional solutions; equitable and reach all children; and finally be directed to new and necessary evidence-based interventions. The mandates and annual funding cycles of foundations are often restrictive and they rarely have a detailed overview of who is best placed to respond in a particular emergency due to lack of direct access on the ground. Nonetheless, foundations and philanthropic organizations play a critical role in supporting the funding and coordination mechanisms in the larger education in emergencies ecosystem. Philanthropic funding for evidence generation, capacity building and global goods in the sector allows for targeted, measurable and high-impact investments that enable the entire education in emergencies system to deliver in a more coordinated and effective way. This is exactly why Dubai Cares supports the ECW secretariat.

Q. How can Dubai Cares, Education Cannot Wait and our partners work to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, and why is universal and inclusive access to education important?’

A. Dubai Cares is playing a key role in helping achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly goal number 4, which aims to ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning by 2030, by supporting programmes in early childhood development, access to quality primary and secondary education, technical and vocational education and training for youth, as well as a particular focus on education in emergencies and protracted crises.

Every child is born equal and education is every child’s birth right; it is unacceptable that children, especially those living in developing countries, have to live in unhygienic conditions, go to school hungry, suffer from diseases and illnesses, work at a young age to support the family, and have little or no access to education, among others. Education equips children and young people with the capacities and qualities necessary to address the challenges that humanity is facing. Education builds sustainable and resilient societies and contributes to the achievement of the other SDGs. Education should be inclusive and universal in its principles and local in its impact.

Foundations along with both governments and the private sector can play a critical role in achieving the SDGs by sharing information, resources, and capabilities. Therefore, collaboration is key to fulfill the goals; it’s not the sole responsibility of one entity – we should altogether join our efforts for the common good. Our strategic partnership with Education Cannot Wait is testimony of the power of partnership to make a lasting change for the millions of children out of school due to conflict or crisis.

Q. How can we provide better access to education for refugees and why is this important?

Refugees face a particular situation with respect to being denied access to education. They are residents in a country different from their own, and have therefore limited, if any, access to their own country’s education system. Education for refugees needs to take place within accountable systems that provide certification to ensure valuable and relevant learning.

In addition, an emergency response should take into account physical protection through measures that include strengthening school infrastructure and providing a safe haven for learning. Moreover, teachers involved in the education of refugees need adequate training and regular pay. Emergency education supplies and materials are also needed to meet the cognitive, psychosocial and developmental needs of children in emergencies.

With all of the above, funding remains the most important aspect of support to ensure that every crisis-affected child and young person is in school and learning. This requires the coming together of grassroots activists and decision-makers from the corridors of power.

Q. Girls in crisis face increased risk of being left behind. How can we work to achieve more equitable and safe educational outcomes for girls and adolescent girls?

A. In some parts of the world, girls are still denied their fundamental right to education for different reasons, not to mention when girls are affected by emergencies. Girls are especially at risk, and are 2.5 times more likely to be out of school in countries affected by conflict than boys.

In order to help girls affected by emergencies, we need to provide girls with the necessary skills and tools to cope within or break the cycle of violence and contribute to their communities’ recovery. In particular, girls need education to take control of their own lives. An educated girl is better protected against gender-based risks, such as early marriage and pregnancy, abuse and exploitation, and also better prepared to be able to make the right choices for herself and her society. In addition, it is crucial to educate boys and men about gender equality by engaging them in promoting girls’ and women’s rights.

Q. Education Cannot Wait supports education responses in many crisis areas in Africa, the Middle East and Asia, including several Arab States. Why is it important to support education responses in these regions? How can it contribute to increasing security and prosperity in these regions?

A. Despite the growing number of children caught in conflict and natural disasters, statistics show only 2% of overall humanitarian aid is spent on education. This makes the needs of children living in fragile states an urgent priority for Dubai Cares.

When Syrian refugee children are forced to leave their homes due to the ongoing conflict or Nepalese children are displaced because of an earthquake or boys and girls in Sierra Leone are quarantined because of the Ebola outbreak, education is one of the first casualties and one of the last services to be restored.

Education in emergencies provides stability and security to refugee children, when everything else around them has collapsed. The classroom has proven to be a peaceful environment for children affected by emergencies. In addition, children gain life-saving skills and acquire critical information on health and safety that they in turn are able to share with their families and communities. Education in emergencies also reduces the psycho-social impact of trauma and displacement. It is also the first line of response for promoting the recovery and wellbeing of children and adolescents.

Q. What is the strategic value-ad of your partnership with Education Cannot Wait?

A. Education Cannot Wait is a first-of-its-kind fund that brings together public and private partners determined to work together, identify creative and collaborative solutions for Education in emergencies and mobilize the funding required to deploy rapid-response and – more importantly – multi-year programmes relevant to each specific crisis context.

Our involvement with Education Cannot Wait opens doors for us to connect directly with implementers, thus allowing us to receive first-hand and real-time information and reports on emergency situations and the required/recommended educational interventions, which we as a foundation would not normally have direct access to. ECW also represents a collaborative way of working that increases coordination and brings together the best minds from around the world to exchange opinions and ideas, broaden knowledge, share best practices, highlight challenges and formulate solutions.

This is specifically of importance to Dubai Cares as it connects us to businesspeople, leaders, employers, innovators, humanitarians and philanthropists who play a critical role in tackling Education in emergencies, from HQ level to the very closest level in the affected countries.

Q. Anything you would like to add?

A. More collaboration at country and thematic levels is key to support harmonized and effective coordination, joint planning, and response in Education in Emergencies programming. Due to the significant role education plays in the well-being of societies, it is of paramount importance that sufficient funding is allocated to this key pillar for the healthy advancement of civilization.

Tariq Al Gurg[1]