WORKING TOGETHER TO BUILD BACK BETTER THROUGH EDUCATION

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread around the world, jeopardizing the education of 1.18 billion learners in 191 countries, some are even more severely affected than others. These are the 75 million children and young people, including 39 million girls, already marginalized by armed conflict, forced displacement and natural disasters – and whose numbers continue to increase.

By Yasmine Sherif, Director, ECW, and Coalition Education

Available in French

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread around the world, jeopardizing the education of 1.18 billion learners in 191 countries, some are even more severely affected than others. These are the 75 million children and young people, including 39 million girls, already marginalized by armed conflict, forced displacement and natural disasters – and whose numbers continue to increase.

Beyond endangering the continuity of education, closing schools increases the risk of abuse and exploitation, including child labor, forced marriage and gender-based violence. It is also likely to have serious psychosocial consequences for children, especially the most vulnerable, including girls and the disabled. Today, the future of an entire generation is in question.

Faced with a challenge of such magnitude, only joint mobilization and a coordinated response can make a difference. Education Cannot Wait has therefore responded to the crisis within the framework of the humanitarian appeal of the United Nations and has participated since the beginning of the crisis in the global coordination group for education led by UNESCO. But to succeed, all actors, including governments and civil society organizations, must come together in a spirit of humanity and multilateralism to mobilize the financial resources required to provide a future to 75 million children and youth left behind.

ECW commends the work of Coalition Education, a coalition of French organizations defending the right to education, which recently published a report on French aid to education. This report highlights the central role of education for peace and development, especially in crisis contexts. Quality education is today more than ever the central vector for accelerating development, strengthening the protection of human rights and enabling the current generation to live a life of dignity, productivity and opportunity.

France was one of ECW’s first partners and shares with ECW a strong commitment to education and gender equality. France’s support to education issues in the global South is essential, both in response to COVID-19, but also for strengthening education systems in the longer term. France’s leadership and influence are even more important in contexts of crisis and fragility where education already suffers from a lack of visibility and investment.

Thanks to the support of France, ECW has piloted in partnership with UNESCO and the Lebanese Ministry of Education innovative learning solutions to respond to COVID-19 to improve access to education for vulnerable children, including refugee and displaced girls and boys, in Lebanon. But we must go further. Education, already underfunded in emergency and protracted crisis contexts, risks being further undermined by the COVID-19 crisis, as development and humanitarian funding may decrease due to economic recession. It needs not be like that if we chose to focus on our hope, rather than our fears.

Some regions are also more vulnerable than others. As highlighted by the report published by Coalition education, the Sahel region and more generally sub-Saharan Africa have a very large number of children and young people out of school, and for these children, access to a protective learning environment means hope for a better future. These regions are at the heart of ECW’s investments, with more than 16 million USD already invested in the Sahel region (Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger) in 2019, and an additional 15 million USD planned for 2020.

Education Cannot Wait looks to France as a great strategic partner to help the collective efforts to succeed in delivering education to children and youth in Chad, Central African Republic, Mali, Burkina Faso and Niger, just to mention a few countries in urgent need. More broadly, ECW aims to raise $ 1.8 billion by 2021 to reach 9 million children and youth in crisis-affected countries. Maintaining the right to education is essential to prevent crises, fight poverty, and reduce inequality. It is the foundation for sustainable development. Without education, there will be no foundation.

Provided that we all come together to reach the 75 million children and youth left furthest behind in conflicts and forced displacement – now doubly affected by COVID-19 – it is not impossible to transform their lives and that of the world. In any case, we must make the impossible possible.

 12 YEARS TO BREAK BARRIERS AND LEAVE NO GIRL BEHIND

2018-09-joint-statement-12-years-break-barriers-girls-education 2018-09-declaration-conjointe-12-annees-education-fillesJoint-statement-header

Today, more girls are in school globally than ever before; but 132 million are not, particularly those in emergencies and in conflict-affected and fragile states. Millions more drop out before they complete their education, and progress for the most marginalized girls is far too slow. These girls struggle to learn the basics, and are under-represented in secondary education, where they would gain the skills, knowledge and opportunities for a productive and fulfilling life.

Far too many girls continue to face barriers to their education, across the lifecycle from early years, through adolescence and into adulthood, including poverty; sexual and gender-based violence; child, early and forced marriage; early and unwanted pregnancy; and restrictive social norms and expectations. Other barriers rest within the school, related to deep-rooted gender discrimination, unequal power relations, and inadequate facilities. By some estimates, one in ten girls in sub-Saharan Africa miss school during menstruation. Gender-based violence in, around and on the way to school knows no geographical, cultural, social, economic or ethnic boundaries. Inclusive, equitable education, in safe and secure environments, which reaches the most vulnerable, including children with disabilities, remains fundamental to achieving the empowerment and economic equality of girls and women, especially in developing contexts and countries struggling with conflict.

Today we meet to take stock, to reaffirm and issue new policy and financial commitments, and to agree on next steps for joint advocacy and action to achieve results for all girls.

We acknowledge that much progress has been made in 2018 to make concrete commitments to advancing girls’ enjoyment of their human right to education, and a contribution to social development, economic growth, and the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The G7 Summit in Canada and the Commonwealth Summit in the UK agreed on commitments with a particular focus on supporting adolescent and highly marginalised girls while they confront enduring barriers to their achievement of positive learning outcomes; while the Global Partnership for Education conference in Senegal saw developing countries commit themselves to invest a further $110 billion in education, coupled with $2.3 billion of ODA pledges by donors. Education Cannot Wait, in barely one year, invested close to $100 million in emergency response plans and multi-year resilience programmes in which 50 percent of the beneficiaries are girls and the majority of teachers are female. With 2030 in sight, we must continue the momentum for shared responsibility, global solidarity, and accountability to ensure no girl is left behind.

We together call on girls themselves, their families and communities, governments, international organizations, civil society and the private sector to join us in our commitment to undertake individual and collective action to dismantle barriers to girls’ education, and to:

  • Increase girls’ access to schools and learning pathways, with a focus on the most marginalized, including those in contexts of emergency, conflict and fragility.
  • Provide opportunity for 12 years of free, safe and quality education that promotes gender equality, builds literacy and numeracy skills, and skills for life and the jobs of the future.

To close existing gaps, we resolve to:

  • Promote gender-responsive education systems, including plans and policies, budgeting, teaching and learning approaches, curriculum and learning materials;
  • Improve coordination between humanitarian assistance and development cooperation, ensuring commitment to gender equality and prioritizing improved access to quality education for girls and women in the early stages of humanitarian response and peacebuilding efforts;
  • Enact and enforce legislation, providing opportunity for 12 years of free basic education, and dismantling barriers to education through wider reform, such as on child, early and forced marriage;
  • Invest in teachers, creating incentives for male and female teachers to provide quality learning opportunities, and expanding professional development in gender-responsive teaching practice;
  • Focus on the hardest to reach girls, including girls in situations of conflict, crisis and fragility, rural girls, and girls with disabilities;
  • Champion schools as safe spaces for learning, free of gender bias, violence and discrimination;
  • Engage communities, parents, boys and men, and girls themselves to challenge the patriarchal beliefs, practices, institutions and structures that drive gender inequality;
  • Monitor progress, and ensure the collection of sex-and age-disaggregated data on a regular basis and its use to redress gender disparities in education and their causes across the lifecycle;
  • Implement integrated and multi-sectoral approaches which empower adolescents to avoid sexual risks and prevent early pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections;
  • Prepare girls for jobs of the future, building digital skills and closing gender gaps in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education.
  • Strengthen international, regional, national, and South-South cooperation to champion girls’ education and make gender equality in and through education a reality.

We commit to galvanizing political will to deliver on the SDG 4 commitments to girls’ education and use upcoming events such as the Global Education 2030 Meeting organized by UNESCO in December 2018 and the SDG High Level Political Forum in July 2019 to take stock of progress in the count down to 2030.

25 September 2018

 

Download PDF: ENGLISH


 

DOUZE ANS POUR SUPPRIMER LES OBSTACLES ET NE LAISSER AUCUNE FILLE DE CȎTÉ

 

 Jamais autant de filles n’ont été scolarisées dans le monde. Toutefois, 132 millions de filles ne vont toujours pas à l’école, en particulier dans les États fragiles, en situation d’urgence ou en proie à des conflits. Des millions d’autres filles quittent l’école prématurément, tandis que les progrès enregistrés pour les plus marginalisées d’entre elles sont encore bien trop lents. Pour ces filles, acquérir les compétences fondamentales est un véritable combat. Elles demeurent en outre sous-représentées dans l’enseignement secondaire, où elles pourraient pourtant acquérir les connaissances et les compétences nécessaires pour construire une existence riche et accomplie.

Les filles et les femmes sont encore beaucoup trop nombreuses à rencontrer des obstacles à leur éducation, tout au long de leur vie, de la petite enfance à l’âge adulte, en passant par l’adolescence : pauvreté, violences sexuelles ou liées au genre, mariages d’enfants, précoces ou forcés, grossesses précoces ou non désirées, ainsi que des normes et des attentes sociales trop restrictives. L’institution scolaire elle-même maintient un certain nombre de barrières : discriminations fondées sur le genre, relations de pouvoir inégalitaires et infrastructures inadaptées. Selon certaines estimations, une fille sur dix, en Afrique subsaharienne, manque l’école pendant ses menstruations. Les violences liées au genre à l’intérieur, aux abords ou sur le chemin de l’école ne connaissent pas de frontières géographiques, culturelles, sociales, économiques ou ethniques. Il demeure donc essentiel d’assurer les conditions d’une école inclusive et équitable, d’une éducation dispensée dans un environnement sain et sûr, qui inclut les plus vulnérables, y compris les enfants en situation de handicap. Il s’agit de rendre les filles et les femmes autonomes, y compris sur le plan économique, en particulier dans les pays en développement et en situation de conflits.

Nous sommes aujourd’hui réunis pour prendre la mesure de cette situation, pour affirmer à nouveau notre volonté d’avancer, pour définir de nouvelles mesures et des engagements financiers et pour convenir d’actions communes afin de garantir des résultats pour toutes les filles.

Convenons-en, de nombreux progrès ont été accomplis en 2018. Des engagements concrets ont été pris afin de garantir que les filles puissent jouir pleinement de leur droit à l’éducation, un droit fondamental contribuant au développement social, à la croissance économique et à la réalisation des objectifs de développement durable (ODD). Les Sommets du G-7 au Canada et du Commonwealth au Royaume-Uni ont débouché sur des engagements précis, notamment en faveur des adolescentes et des filles les plus marginalisées, tandis que la Conférence du Partenariat mondial pour l’éducation organisée au Sénégal a vu les pays en développement s’engager à investir 110 milliards de dollars supplémentaires dans l’éducation, auxquels s’ajoutent 2,3 milliards de dollars de la part de donateurs. Education Cannot Wait / Éducation ne peut pas attendre a investi en à peine un an près de 100 millions de dollars dans des plans d’intervention d’urgence et des programmes pluriannuels de résilience dans lesquels 50% des bénéficiaires sont des filles, et la majorité des enseignants des femmes. Dans la perspective de l’échéance de 2030, nous devons entretenir cette dynamique en faveur d’une responsabilité commune, d’une solidarité mondiale et d’un principe de redevabilité, pour faire en sorte qu’aucune fille ne soit laissée de côté.

Ensemble, nous appelons les filles elles-mêmes, ainsi que leurs familles et communautés respectives, les gouvernements, les organisations internationales, la société civile, le secteur privé, tous les acteurs de l’éducation, à s’engager avec nous, et à agir, à titre individuel ou collectif, pour lever les obstacles à l’éducation des filles et pour :

 

  • améliorer l’accès des filles à l’éducation et aux parcours d’apprentissage, en ciblant les plus marginalisées d’entre elles, notamment celles qui se trouvent dans des situations d’urgence, de conflit ou de vulnérabilité ;
  • assurer 12 années d’un enseignement gratuit, sûr et de qualité, qui s’attache à promouvoir l’égalité de genre et à renforcer les compétences en matière d’écriture, de lecture et de calcul, ainsi que les compétences nécessaires à la vie quotidienne et aux métiers de demain.

 

Afin de combler les écarts qui existent, nous sommes déterminés à :

 

  • promouvoir des systèmes éducatifs prenant en compte les questions de genre, notamment en matière de planification, de réglementation, de budget, d’approches et de ressources pédagogiques et de programmes d’enseignement ;
  • améliorer la coordination entre l’aide humanitaire et la coopération pour le développement, en garantissant un engagement de tous les acteurs en faveur de l’égalité de genre, et en faisant de l’accès à une éducation de qualité pour les filles et les femmes une priorité dès les premiers moments de l’intervention humanitaire et les premiers efforts pour instaurer la paix ;
  • promulguer et faire appliquer des lois permettant d’assurer 12 années d’un enseignement de base gratuit et de lever les obstacles à l’éducation, grâce à des réformes plus larges, portant par exemple sur les mariages d’enfants, précoces et forcés ;
  • investir dans les enseignants en mettant en place des mesures incitatives pour que les enseignants, hommes et femmes, puissent bénéficier de conditions d’apprentissage de qualité et soient formés aux pratiques pédagogiques qui intègrent une perspective de genre;
  • se concentrer sur les filles les plus marginalisées, notamment celles qui se trouvent en situation de conflit, de crise ou de vulnérabilité, celles qui vivent en milieu rural et celles qui ont un handicap ;
  • promouvoir les écoles en tant que lieux d’apprentissage sûrs, exempts de préjugés, de violences ou de discriminations liées au genre ;
  • encourager les communautés, les parents, les garçons et les hommes, ainsi que les filles elles-mêmes, à remettre en question les croyances, les pratiques, les institutions et les structures patriarcales qui favorisent les inégalités de genre ;
  • suivre les progrès et assurer la collecte de données réparties par sexe et par âge de manière régulière, et suivre l’utilisation de ces données pour remédier aux inégalités fondées sur le genre dans l’éducation ;

 

  • adopter des approches intégrées et multisectorielles qui donnent aux adolescentes les moyens d’éviter les risques liés à la sexualité et de prévenir les grossesses précoces et les maladies sexuellement transmissibles ;
  • préparer les filles aux métiers de demain, développer leurs compétences dans le domaine du numérique et combler l’écart entre filles et garçons dans l’enseignement des sciences, de la technologie, de l’ingénierie et des mathématiques ;
  • resserrer la coopération internationale, régionale, nationale et Sud-Sud pour promouvoir l’éducation des filles et faire en sorte que l’égalité de genre dans et par l’éducation devienne une réalité.

 

Nous sommes déterminés à mobiliser les volontés politiques en vue de la réalisation des engagements de l’ODD 4 en faveur de l’éducation des filles, ainsi qu’à mettre à profit les grandes manifestations à venir, telles que la Réunion mondiale Éducation 2030 organisée par l’UNESCO en décembre 2018 et le Forum politique de haut niveau consacré aux ODD en 2019 pour dresser un bilan des progrès accomplis au regard de l’échéance de 2030.

 

25 septembre 2018

Download PDF: FRENCH